d’Verse Poets Pub- Synchronicity-Spring Happens

As a poetry form, this consists of eight three-line stanzas in a syllable pattern of 8/8/2. This poetry type has no rhyme and is written in the first person with a twist. The twist is to be revealed within the last two stanzas.



Spring Happens

An icy wind blows ferocious
As the sun interrupts its grasp,
Winning.
A setback but not a retreat
As winter poises to remain
In charge.
Timeless struggle where seasons grate,
Dynamic cyclical efforts
For naught.
Sealed fates in time resist moving.
An inertia enforced morphing
of Truth.
Foolish and headstrong is winter.
Tenacious and patient, the Spring
steals ground.
Inevitable transforming
Inches forward righteously calm.
Serene.
The sun gets involved and its settled.
No debate allowed anymore,
It’s done.
Nature’s resolve is unyielding.
Spring has sprung in spite of the wind.
Hurrah!

d’Verse Poets Pub- Winter

Winter is a silent mysterious stranger.
A man who knows nothing- but has shining eyes-
Crystals of frozen secrets.
He grasps where everything’s buried.

Tightly held in whirling frigid air
The colors he robs -in an icy fingered fist-
Cleverly purloined hues – one great pause.
No remorse in the conqueror.

Or perhaps, she’s a tender woman
Rocking her babes- against her bosom-
A dormant slumber- caressed by shushing breaths-
Bundled and held precious.

Soft lips blowing out the light.
Quieting the night- pristine whiteness-
Winter’s loving embrace -twinkling frosty hopes-
A guardian of her tomorrows.

He stands in the shadows.
She never speaks.
Both or neither,
It’s not for us to know.

Inspired by:
Wallace Stevens’ The Snow Man
Poetics: Beyond Meaning or The Resolution of Opposites | dVerse (dversepoets.com)

NATURE KNOWLEDGE: Blue Jay

Blue Jays are very commonly found in central and eastern USA, as well as, Canada. They are stunning birds but, due to the fact that they are numerous, often these birds are not fully appreciated. Humans seem to treasure rarity above beauty.

BIRDS AND FISH 029close up jayThese birds stay where they have grown up and brave winter. Their breathtaking blue colors are a delight to behold against a winter white background. I was aware that Indigo Buntings (another, more rare, blue-colored bird) gained their blue color from a deflecting of light. The feathers do not have a blue pigment. According to Wikipedia, Blue Jay feathers have the same properties.

“As with most other blue-hued birds, the Blue Jay’s coloration is not derived from pigments but is the result of light interference due to the internal structure of the feathers;[7] if a blue feather is crushed, the blue disappears as the structure is destroyed.[8] This is referred to as structural coloration.”

Blue Jay males, and females, share the same bright coloration. They build open topped nests in tree limbs and have 2-7 eggs in each clutch. These birds love seeds and nuts and frequent bird feeders.

BIRDS AND FISH 027found itWhen Mother Nature made these birds so beautiful in appearance, she must have felt as though she had done enough.  Their voices lack beauty and their loud raspy cries are borderline annoying. When you add a brash, bold attitude, there are more than a few people who don’t like these beauties.

One group who does appreciate Blue Jays are hunters. Not only are Blue Jays bossy, they are nosey. Often these birds announce the presence of intruders with their incessant reports. This can alert animals and hunters to danger or big game in the area.

As the most recognizable local bird by sound and sight, Blue Jays are the first on my list when introducing birds to kids.

Blue Jays are a BIG favorite of mine!

NATURE KNOWLEDGE: Red-Tailed Bumblebees

new photos 017redRed- tailed bumblebees are delightful to watch in my garden. They are easy to spot, with their bright patch of orange, as they buzz around nectar rich flowers. Colonies, of these bees, number around 200 members. Aren’t they pretty?

2948342526_cf7a110d6f_bThe queens come out of hibernation in early Spring. Queenie lays eggs of worker bees right away. The workers build nests in stone crevasses or , sometimes, in old birds nests. They tend the eggs too. A while later, the male bees hatch to mate with females and carry on the nectar collecting business, which is their source of food. In the Fall, all the males (including worker bees) and the old queen die…the new queens, hatched that year, hibernate in order to start the cycle again in the spring.

These bumblebees are common in the United States and Europe. In recent times, their numbers have diminished as their habitat has been reduced and pesticides have killed some of them off. You can make a difference in their population numbers by keeping nectar rich flowers in your gardens.

Last season, I noticed an alarmingly reduced number of honeybees and red-tailed bumblebees. Part of last year’s dilemma was, in my opinion, the unusually warm and snow-free winter which affected the natural timing of tree flowers with bee hatching. Whatever the reason, my fruit trees bore far fewer fruit due to the absence of pollinators. I have high hopes for this spring to come.

As a footnote, I have never been stung by a bumblebee. One of my favorite childhood activities was catching them in jars, then releasing them. Mom warned that I was asking for stings, yet they never did. The photos above were taken by practically placing my camera lens on the subjects…still no stings. I don’t recommend antagonizing bees but would hope that people avoid them rather than kill them. They are very important to farmers and our produce!

Northern Cardinals in Western Massachusetts

This winter has been very mild here in Massachusetts. No snow on the ground. Our only measurable snow came in late October. Mild temps have kept this area in a perpetual early spring like pattern.

I love watching birds and have noticed patterns of their appearances, in my backyard, over many years. January 25th has been the day when I started hearing, what I call, the Northern Cardinal Spring Song for the last 3 winters. It was so very predictable that I felt as though I had stumbled upon a Natural timing that most were unaware of. This year,I have yet to hear it.

It is February 7th, 2012. Other birds are singing but the predictors of the approaching of Spring, are silent.

I have 2 theories about this unusual event.

1. It may just be that food sources are so easily found this year that the cardinals are more wide-spread. My own bird feeder has needed few refills. I have therefore spotted fewer cardinals stopping for my ready meal.

2. The weather somehow has had a confusing effect on the timing of the Northern Cardinal’s courting. They may well know that winter is on its way with a vengeance.

Whatever the reason, I have enjoyed the balmy weather, this year, but have felt a bit lonesome for the Northern Cardinals serenades the past few weeks. They will sound all the sweeter when they do.

PS. After searching for the best video to add to this post, I learned how diverse the cardinal songs can be. Wow! I know ours by heart and feel privileged to know my local avian friends on that level.

I finally heard their song on Feb.13th,2012

The Stocked-up Feeling

The roads are a little slick today and snow continues to sugar-coat the area.

When you live in New England, traveling at all in the winter is not a guarantee. This winter has been very easy on us. The series of alternating freezing and balmy temps have kept accumulating snow at bay. (I am worried about my perennial flowers though. Snow cover is much better for them.) Anyway, there is a feeling that most New England dwellers may identify with. I call it the “stocked-up feeling”.

This morning my husband dropped me at the supermarket as he ran banking errands. The slippery travel awakens a survival instinct to stock up just in case the weather worsens and you are housebound. Intellectually, I know we have provisions that could keep us easily for a month in our freezer but stocking the refrigerator and making sure pet food and toilet paper is abundant, makes me feel safe and cozy. There’s nothing quite as cozy as knowing you have enough coffee for a year.

So as I sit here at my keyboard, I am at peace…there’s bulk hamburger in my frig and 200 more q-tips in my bathroom. Mother nature can bring it on!