SoCS- Rope- Just Thinking…

Offering a stream of consciousness, is a way to ‘rope’ others into a small segment of our thought process.
I can’t speak for anyone else but mine is wild and messy.
Have you ever asked someone, “What are you thinking about?” and been told, “Nothing.”? I’d guess many times that’s a ballpark generic answer in an effort not to have to explain just like our inclination to answer the question “How are you?” with “Fine.”. But sometimes, I wonder if not having anything on your mind is truly possible? It isn’t for me but how would I know how the mind of others work.
When I’m mowing my lawn, washing dishes, or listening to the radio, there’s always something on my mind. It may only be the appreciation for a favorite tune or what I’ll make for supper, but I never feel a ‘blank’.
This leads me to ask if everyone experiences an ongoing internal dialog with themselves, especially on complex ideas. I do. Questioning myself is a big part of it too.
I find this topic fascinating because it’s one of many things each of us can never know.
Can anyone know if the taste in their own mouth is the exact same taste for another person? We know our favoring of tastes is different but experiencing the taste and what makes a person favor it or not, isn’t possible. That’s a cool concept but also frustrating for those who are hopelessly curious.
Drawing this to a conclusion comes down to my personal realization of how infrequently ‘we humans’ can be certain of anything. We know our senses can fool us, we’ve become alarmingly aware that other humans we give the title of ‘expert’ can’t be sure, and our dear parents aren’t any more able to be unbiased or certain, than we. In no way does that mean that nothing is real or true. This is more of a warning to never stop revisiting those foundations before we assess other things, just like keeping an eye on the sturdiness of that stepladder you’re climbing. Truth comes tumbling down if you don’t or possibly, you’ll end up dangling in a misty ‘nowhere’ land of self-serving definitions and facts. (Hint: Just because a large number of people say they know ‘the truth’ doesn’t mean that they do. You need to pursue it for yourself.)
Thinking critically, and constantly challenging our own conclusions, seems all we can do in order to pursue truth and stay intellectually honest and open-minded.
Have a great weekend and keep thinking!

Subliminal Messages: What we really are telling kids.

Jenn & John 108

Why do we adults avoid telling kids the truth?

I’m not talking about the “birds and the bees” at an inappropriate age. I’m thinking more about just telling them why things, that they don’t like, are good for them. I do it too. The little song and dance for vegetables. The demand that homework be done first, before play….”because I said so.”

Well, I have started telling the kids the “whys” and “why nots” more often. If they don’t, at first, understand my reasons…I’m going to keep at it until they do. Like eating vegetables, the plain truth can taste bad but we keep offering the vegetables, why not keep explaining?

My daughter, Ellen, surprised and pleased me yesterday. (BTW-She does it often.) Her daughter, Katherine, came home, from her first grade class, with valentines. One large red heart from the teacher was a “get-out-of 1 homework assignment” coupon.

Ellen grimaced. “I don’t like this.”

She was, in my opinion, exactly correct. What that coupon did was counteract the message that we’d worked to convey to Katherine. Homework is necessary. It helps you practice and remember your lessons and is the perfect gauge that measures if you really understood what is going on.

Instead, the message of homework as an optional drudgery, rang “clear as a bell”.

Ellen’s, advice to her daughter, was,”Let’s save this. You may be sick one day but I think, not using it , will bring you a reward. We’ll talk about the reward.”

We adults convey subliminal messages to kids with our reactions. I catch myself frequently and attempt not to do this.

I had remembered advice given by a dentist, who’d seen very many frightened kids coming for their first visits. He advised parents to never treat the dentist visit as “evil” with phrases like, “Sorry, but you have to go.” or “If you are very brave, we’ll get a treat after.” That stuck with me and I use that advice when I talk to kids about any subject. I listen to myself from the viewpoint of a child. Takes practice, and isn’t fool-proof, but advice worthy of sharing with all of you.