Haibun Monday-d’Verse Poets Pub- Sharing a Song

  • Write a haibun about a special moment in September and post it on your blog.
  • Click on Mr. Linky below to add your name and direct url to your work.
  • Add a link for dVerse on your page so others can find us as well.
  • Visit other poets on the list to read their poems and comment.
  • Visit our virtual pub and say hello.
  • Have fun!


The most memorable songs that I learned in grade school were about Autumn. I’ve taught my favorite ones to my granddaughters and just this last weekend, a cool breeze accompanied by the sound of migrating geese made us break into song.
“Autumn leaves falling and Autumn birds calling. Nippy cool weather for flying South together.
Leaves of warm orange and leaves of golden yellow, cover the hillsides with colors soft and mellow.”

I cannot find this 1960s children’s song anywhere on the internet. How delightful that I was able to pass it along!

Beyond September
Nature will hearten seedlings
Topped by tattered leaves

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As an afterthought, I looked for an old video of my oldest granddaughter singing our song. I found it!
She was four in the video… just this month she just turned 17. Follow my Facebook link to hear it.
https://www.facebook.com/susan.st.pierre.50/videos/177162813827

Haibun Monday: Look up!- An Imagined Storm

Today I want you to write about a time you looked up and saw. . .something. If nothing comes to mind, then look up now. What do you see? Write a haibun about it.
___________________________



“BOOM!”
Out of nowhere, an extremely close clap of thunder shook my bones. It was the kind that crackled as it dissipated.
Four pairs of bewildered, less than 5-year-old, eyes looked up examining my face for my reaction. Keenly aware of my role as an interpreter and guardian, I smiled and said, “Whoa guy! What do you think those angels dropped this time?”.
A cacophony, almost as intense as the thunder, surrounded me with suggestions:
“A bowling ball!”
“I think it’s a statue that gots tipped over!”
“It’s a bookcase one of them was climbing on! I heard papers falling like when I did that!”
“Oh no it’s not. It sounds just like my Daddy’s hammer smashing a window when Mommy locks him out!”
Luckily, not a moment later, a series of quick flashes changed the subject until the same child, who was just exposing sensitive family business, spoke again,
“Yep. I was right! There’s Mommy’s shooting our fireworks back at Daddy!”


Seedlings grow on a promise
Spring’s hopeful bounty
Fated to weather some storms


[The fireworks and hammer are fictitious but the reaction of children when startled and their humorous tendency to expose and embellish stories about their parents during my family daycare years, are quite true.]


https://dversepoets.com/2022/08/01/haibun-monday-look-up/

d’Verse Haibun Monday- 3-28-22 Cherry Blossoms

New to haibun? The form consists of one to a few paragraphs of prose—usually written in the present tense—that evoke an experience and are often non-fictional/autobiographical. They may be preceded or followed by one or more haiku—nature-based, using a seasonal image—that complement without directly repeating what the prose stated.


Cherry trees struggle around my New England home as dynamic weather fronts roll in and out. Last week, we enjoyed 70 degrees F and today a bitter wind blows arctic temperatures around. A ‘wicked’ development according to local slang. So, to those plants and people not yet acclimated to our “on again, off again” ‘teasery’, there’s a danger of overcommitment and casual disregard for “what ifs”. A ‘shock and awe’ challenge to their comfortable existence often arises to their peril. Only the steady and sturdy can prevail in such uncertain weather. People would be wise to claim those same attributes in our uncertain world.

Cynical blossom
Springs from exile cautiously
A fruitful future

Haibun Monday 1/31/22 Harbingers of Hope

For those new to haibun, the form consists of one to a few paragraphs of prose—usually written in the present tense—that evoke an experience and are often non-fictional/autobiographical. They may be preceded or followed by one or more haiku—nature-based, using a seasonal image—that complement without directly repeating what the prose stated.

In winter, moments before Spring’s advent, I listen. Male Northern Cardinals are poised to start singing their ‘welcome song’. They are the first creatures who set their sights on longer, and warmer, days in New England. Do they speak for us or to each other?
My ears have an instinct born from years of paying attention to the ‘little things’. It’s time. And when I’m granted witness, I’ll pause lifting my smiling face toward the sun, presently connected to the natural world’s harbingers of hope.

Birds aren’t vain nor proud.
Voices raised toward heaven,
Life professing joy.


Haibun Monday 6-21-21 Solstice – Git ‘er Done

New to haibun? The form consists of one to a few paragraphs of prose—usually written in the present tense—that evoke an experience and are often non-fictional/autobiographical. They may be preceded or followed by one or more haiku—nature-based, using a seasonal image—that complement without directly repeating what the prose stated.

See the source image

There’s something about early daylight that pokes me awake only to bury my head with an extra pillow. The morning must be paused if I’m to go the distance. Drawing shades helps but I know it’s there pressing on my window.
It’s too early to mow. Let’s face it, mowing can be done at an hour that six months earlier would have found me wearing slippers and fluffing bed pillows.
The dogs don’t forget those ‘calling it a day’ hours, though. Seven-thirty pm and they’re asking to go to bed even before waning daylight insists that it’s time to rest.
But, the summer solstice somehow exerts extra pressures on humans to deny sleepiness and ‘git ‘er done’.


Farmers, so hardy.
Endless chores while daylight burns.
In winter, they’ll sleep.






Haibun Monday 6-21-21: Solstice I | dVerse (dversepoets.com)

Haibun Monday 5-24-21: Flower moon

How about it, poets? Ready to write some moon haibun? Feel free to take yours in whatever direction inspires you: just allude to the Floral Moon.

See the source image


A full moon casts shadows in the woods after midnight. Once stealthy creatures move without hesitation expecting to cast their own shadows to startle prey into straightforward pursuit. The Floral Moon welcomes the beauty and bounty of springtime during the briefest of annual dances with darkness. A bustling dynamic erupts intentionally and recklessly. This seasonal awakening of the forest -a withholding of sleep- invigorates all things wild.

Annual bounty
Once the Floral Moon rises
Vigor haunts the night


Haibun Monday 5-24-21: Flower moon | dVerse (dversepoets.com)

Haibun Monday – d’Verse Poets Pub

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The Spring season’s chilled breath holds back the inevitable procession toward summer. I button my over shirt until the sun makes its intention known and coaxes me to strip that layer. Even the robin fluffs itself as it bops in the thickening grasses rewarded with tender newly awakened worms. This moment of ‘just right’ fills me. I wouldn’t mind elongating this period to put off the advent of dog days.

Green is my season
Relishing the temperate
Sublime revival


Haibun Monday 4-26-21: The Present Moment | dVerse (dversepoets.com)