SoCS- 8/13/22- Ugly on the Farm

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is starts with “u.” Find a word that starts with the letter “u” and use it however you’d like. Bonus points if it’s the first word in your post. Enjoy!

Unfortunately, I wasn’t online for a few days but upon my return this morning I found this prompt perfect for a little jaunt down memory lane.
My word is “ugly”.
My Mom has always emphasized good grammar. Word meanings were also important. One particular pet peeve of hers was the use of “probably” and “possibly” interchangeably. Those words are NOT interchangeable. The former means “more than likely” or “an excellent chance” and the latter means “there’s a chance” or “it’s 50/50 odds” that something will happen.
Well, on the same word meaning examination angle, Mom always told us to say “homely” to describe mildly unattractive people or animals. The word “ugly” was reserved for only the “grotesque” images.
Here’s my associated tale:
My grandma was a farmer and, of course, from the older generation. I don’t know if it’s a ‘country thing’ or an ‘elder thing’ but Grandma expressed herself often in idiomatic terms.
“Make hay will the sun shines”
“Between a rock and a hard place”
“At sixes and sevens”
were all frequently heard and Many, Many, more!
I was about six years old and likely being a pest to my very busy, hard-working, Grandma when she said to me, “If you keep that up, I’ll get ‘ugly’.”
I specifically remember studying Grandma’s face thinking, “My wonderful Grandma could never be ugly.”
Of course, all went along well thereafter because whatever I’d been doing gave way to quiet contemplation of her odd word usage.
Not long after that, Grandma instructed me to stay safely in the car while she spoke to a neighbor in the neighbor’s dooryard because, ” We don’t know if that farm dog in the yard is “ugly” or not.”
When I observed the BEAUTIFUL German shepherd (He was far from even homely.), I figured out what she meant by ‘ugly’! LOL
The world and my grandma’s words had become clear. Ugly meant ‘mean’, ‘vicious’ or ‘mad’!

To this day, I can ‘ace’ the Jeopardy category on American Idioms just from having spent time on the farm with my beloved Grandma. 😀
Hope you all had a wonderful Saturday and none of you got ‘ugly’!


https://lindaghill.com/2022/08/12/the-friday-reminder-and-prompt-for-socs-aug-13-2022/

Example Rules

Al Sharpton
Al Sharpton (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I was remembering one of my first triumphs at school. It was an aptitude test on English grammar. In second grade, we were asked to choose the correct form of a word to plug into a sentence. Since we had no formal grammatical training before the test, I was very pleased to “ace” it.
Why did I have those skills at age eight? Simply because proper grammar was spoken in my home.
The English language has rules… not the kind meant to restrict our behavior, but those which apply in order to keep us on “the same page” and in the “same game”.
When I consider the modern distaste for rules, in general, and the emphasis on diversity, I realize many young parents are throwing an obstacle into their children’s education (and success) when they refuse to use proper grammar.
I understand that bilingual households are at a disadvantage automatically. All the more reason, in my opinion, for parents to school themselves in proper English.
Language has little to do with culture, so the clinging to slang and the blocking of the kids’ understanding of the rules of English grammar in the home, make no sense.
Al Sharpton is an intelligent man…Yet, he talks in a “street” dialect that, I assume, is an attempt to be “common” and endearing to the African American community. He “ain’t” helping anyone by confusing folks about English enunciation and grammar. Especially those people who have never lived in an environment where the rules of English were followed. Leading by example would be more helpful and honorable, in my opinion. Breaking other rules may gain a person attention and bravado but the rules of English language, once ignored, are terribly difficult to reclaim.
So, when parents consider helping their children’s efforts for a good education, the most important edge they can offer is the example of good grammar spoken at home.

Good Grammar

Good grammar never ends…

Use among when you say friends.

Say between when there are two.

Don’t say me and you.

Make a list, you’re at the end.

Unthaw  means frozen,  friend.

Ain’t  is not a word.

You don’t want to be absurd.

Less is an amount.

Use fewer when you count.

You are much too smart

To let speech fall apart.

There are rules in every game.

Good grammar needs the same.

Probably…Possibly

Say what?

My mom and dad had a language barrier that they could not seem to overcome.

Mother is a teacher and a lover of words.

Father is the first generation of an Italian immigrant mother.

Words just held different meanings and sometimes different pronunciations and enunciation.

Their most common “ships passing in the night” moment was with the words probably and possibly.

To my mom, they had quite different meanings. To my dad, they were interchangeable and meant the same thing.

Sparks flew often when Mom had been told that we were probably going to visit Grandma and Grandpa on the weekend only to find out that the plans weren’t confirmed at all. The funny thing about this is I believe my mother never really learned to decipher my father’s language. I admit it was not precise BUT how could you keep falling for it mother? LOL.

The point of this post is to make fun of the way people understand our language differently.

I still think alot should be a real word by now.

How many folks have you heard say suposably lately? These people are not idiots, they just find language a tool not an art. For most writer’s it’s an art form. Please be patient with those who use it as a tool or you may miss some very interesting information.